Tag Archives: Connaught

Galway, St Francis Abbey – John Nolan (c1733-1793) – of Loughboy??

Recently James F. Nolan of Wisconsin and his wife (see earlier Post) found in the courtyard of St. Francis abbey, Galway city,  an old Nolan tombstone dating back to the 1700s reading as follows: “Lord have mercy on the soul of  John Nolan who died August 26, 1793 aged sixty years.”

Based upon the writings of James Hardiman in the early 1800s (History of Galway),  we also know that an older Nolan memorial is known to have existed on the grounds of St. Francis abbey, having been refurbished sometime before that by a Michael O’Nolan of Loughboy.  To my knowledge, for reasons unknown, no recent visitor to the abbey has been able to locate this memorial which presumably existed in the early 1800s when Hardiman wrote about it.  Could the tombstone inscription for  John Nolan (c1733-1793) have been etched unto the older existing Nolan memorial?  Based upon my experience this would certainly be a possibility, perhaps using another side of the stone.  I would therefore suggest that the headstone found by Jim (James F. Nolan of Wisconsin) be more closely inspected to see if traces of earlier inscriptions can be found.

Putting this possibility aside and reflecting upon who the John Nolan who died in 1793 might have been,  a promising lead is found at the website documenting Galway’s Landed Estates.  From the information found at the website it is evident that  a John Nolan of Loughboy existed in the 1700s but one generation earlier than the “John Nolan” buried in the abbey courtyard.  Could the John Nolan (1774-1820) of Loughboy documented on  a webpage at the Galway Landed Estates website have been the son of the John Nolan buried in the St. Francis abbey courtyard?

Circumstancial evidence pointing in this direction certainly exists! Recall that it was a “Michael O’Nolan of Loughboy” who erected the older, now lost (?), memorial to the Nolans of Loughboy.  That the John Nolan buried on the grounds of the St Francis abbey be of the Loughboy Nolan family would be consistent with the fact that Nolans of Loughboy had already been buried there in earlier times.

A review of the sources cited at the Galway Landed Estates webpage (see link above)  may help to confirm or refute this conjecture.  Following is the relevant excerpt from ta page found at the Galway Landed Estates website:

BEGINNING of EXCERPT

Nolan/ Ferrall (Lugboy) Estate

  • Reference #3380: Deeds re. estate of
    John Nolan of Loughboy, Co Mayo, 1774-1820.
    D. 16,536-16,538
    (RN:  available at the National Library of Ireland )
  • Reference #5110: Agreement between
    John Nolan of Cloonaville, county Sligo & John Nolan of Logboy, county Mayo re repayment of loan, 1810.
    D. 16,537   
    (RN:  available at the National Library of Ireland )
  • Reference #12375: Westport Estate Papers, Collection List 78. Details of Lord Oranmore and Browne’s lands sold in the Encumbered Estates’ Court, including  8 lots purchased
    by John Nolan Ferrall, May 1855.
    MS 40,966/34
    (RN:  available at the National Library of Ireland )

END of EXCERPT

For anyone interested in the Nolans of Loughboy, Lugboy or Lugboy (current spelling) , Co. Mayo, an article entitled “The Nolan Chantry” and relating to a descendant of the Nolan-Ferrall family,  a Monsignor Edmond Nolan, son of John Nolan of Logboy,  was published in the March 2015 edition of the Nolan Clan Newsletter.
From this article and other sources it would appear that this line of Nolans was of the Roman Catholic persuasion as would have been the John Nolan buried on the grounds of the St. Francis abbey.

At this point I would also like to express my sincere thanks to Jim Nolan of Wisconsin and his wife for bringing to our attention the old Nolan tombstone in the courtyard of St. Francis abbey in Galway city.

With best regards,
Roger Nowlan,  webmaster and Nolan Clan Newsletter editor.

Connaught – O’Nolan Origins

Attached are a few references which, in my opinion, are relevant to our discussion on the “early origins of the O’Nolans of Connaught”.

In essence, the attached references suggest that O’Nolans (O hUllachains) from counties Offaly or Limerick followed the Anglo-Normans into Connaught beginning in the early 1200s:

  • as part of Irish forces allied with the O’Briens of Thomond/Clare (who had intermarried with the de Burghs) when O’Flaherty’s castle was taken over in 1228 by Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster
  • as tenants to Anglo-Norman lords granted lands in Connaught by the de Burghs, starting in 1238, after their victory in 1237
  • as tradesmen/craftspeople supplying services to the Anglo-Normans of Connaught (e.g. carpenters, metalworkers, etc.).

This is a first post in a series of Posts solliciting feedback/comments
on how to best interpret the information contained in available sources:

Thank You,
Roger

Connaught – Michael O’Nolan of Loughboy

I have been researching my Nolan family ancestry for about fifteen years and have found a direct lineage back to Thomas Nolan C1560-1628 of Ballinrobe.

James Hardiman in his History of Galway refers to a Michael O’Nolan who rebuilt a family tomb of his Kilkenny ancestors in 1473. Todate I have found little other information about Michael O’Nolan and am wondering if other Clan members can assist me in my research, which is being done for an article in the Newsletter..

Thanks Wayne Nolan

Nolan Family of Connaught

I am researching the Nolan Family from the Old Province of Connaught particularly those from Counties Galway and Mayo. This family established at least three descendant lines from Thomas Nolan C1560-1628 to the current day. These lines are the Ballybanagher line, the Ballinderry line and the Logboy line.

At this point it appears that I am the only known descendant who has taken the FTDNA Y-DNA tests under “The Nolan DNA Project”.

It would help our research if there are any Nolan male members who believe they are a descendant from either of the three lines from Thomas Nolan, could take a test, even a Y-37 at this stage would help clarify some of the research recently undertaken.

Thanks Wayne Nolan