1916 Irish
Volunteer Brigades

In Dublin

      • P Nolan & Patrick Nolan at Boland’s Mills
      • Tomas Ó Nualláin at the Four Courts
      • John Nolan at City Hall
      • Patrick Nolan at Jacob’s Factory
          • George Nolan on Marrowbone Lane

Patrick Nolan, Boland’s Mills, served in “A” Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade. Born in 1895 he died on the 12th of April 1979. He fought at Boland’s Mills, on Grand Canal Street and along the Dublin and South Eastern Railway Line between Westland Row and Lansdowne Road. He also fought during the War of Independence and remained with the National Army up to 1924 being a Lieutenant with the Mechanical Transport Corps.

George Nolan, Marrowbone Lane, served in “A” Company,  4th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, fighting on Marrowbone Lane throughout Easter Week.  On the day of the surrender he was ordered by Con Colbert to deliver letters to Fathers Kiernan and Eugene at Mont Argus and after delivering the letters he was not to return to Marrowbone Lane, as a result he was not interned after the Rising. In 1917 his Company was reorganised and he fought throughout the War of Independence. At Christmas 1920 he was recruited into a full time Active Service Unit and took part in several attacks on British personnel including Colonel Winters and the burning of the Customs House.

In County Wexford

Michael Nolan, Enniscorthy, served in “A” Company, Enniscorthy, Wexford Brigade. Aged 47 years old at the time of the Rising, he fought at the Athenaeum, Saint John’s Mill, Cooperative Road and Slaney Road Enniscorthy and at Manor Mills Enniscorthy. He joined the Volunteers at their inception in Enniscorthy in 1913 and was also a member of the I.R.B. Arrested at his place of work on Tuesday the 2nd of May, he was taken from Enniscorthy to Waterford and then to Richmond Barracks Dublin before being deported to Stafford. He was released from Stafford on May 17th 1916. He had no further activity with the Volunteers or I.R.A. and did not take part in the War of Independence or Civil War.

In County Galway

Bartley Nolan served as a Volunteer in the Castlegar Company of the Galway Brigade, Irish Volunteers. Aged about 20 years old during the Rising he fought at Carnmore Cross, Agricultural Station Athenry, Moyode and Limepark County Galway. He went on the run after the Rising and was captured on May 9th. He was released from Frongoch Prison at the beginning of August 1916 and re-joined the Volunteers on reorganisation in 1917. He took no part in the Civil War.

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